Wednesday, 22 October 2008

The Crafters' Way 71 - Green Coasters

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Plastic Bag Coasters




This activity is quite simple, however care does need to be taken. It is not an activity that I would recommend for young children; responsible teens could undertake if they follow safety directions. You will be heating plastic shopping bags. Please work in a well-ventilated area and take care that the bags don’t overheat. Please read all instructions before commencing.




You will need:
Plastic shopping bags
Iron set to LOW
Baking Paper
Decorative Scissors (optional)
Angelina Fibres or Tinsel










Step 1: Cut you plastic bag into squares. You can judge the size I have used by comparing the size of my embroidery scissors to the plastic. You need to squares to be bigger than the finished coaster. Don’t fuss if they aren’t “square”. You need at least 6 squares.









Step 2: Place 1 sheet of baking paper onto ironing board. Then layer 5 of the plastic squares on top.










Step 3: sprinkle Angelina Fibres or Tinsel onto the top plastic square.










Step 4: Cover with last layer of plastic












Step 5: place another sheet of baking paper on top. Make sure you completely cover the plastic.







Step 6: With your iron set to low, iron over the baking paper. The plastic will shrink. Do this carefully, checking to make sure that holes don’t appear.







Step 7: Allow a few minutes to cool. You can see how much shrinkage there was in the sample. This can vary depending on your bag.




Step 8: Using decorative scissors trim to coaster size.




Options: For a firmer coaster include a piece of cardboard between layers – recycled cereal boxes work well.
Use threads or Christmas card motifs between layers
Sew edges with decorative machine stitching.
Back to more Free Craft Projects.

2 comments:

Bec said...

Great tutorial!! Although I think I will need to get myself a dedicated craft iron before I attempt it. My husband already gets cranky when I accidently leave bits of fusible interfacing stuck to the ironing board (I have never met a person more anal about ironing their shirts - think he takes it as a personal challenge each day to get them 'perfect' :P). I can imagine bits of glitter and plastic would be even less well received!!!!!

Artdecadence said...

..this is fabulous...and could be used to make so many things...thanks for sharing...and for excellent clear instructions...chrisy